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Monday
Mar202017

Gallup Poll: Trump Approval Rating Drops to 47 Percent

A Gallup poll shows President Donald Trump's approval rating is 37 percent, the lowest since he took office two months ago.

The Gallup daily poll, based on a three-day rolling average released Saturday, shows 37 percent of Americans approve of the job Trump is doing as president, while 58 percent disapprove.

On Jan. 22, three days after Trump was sworn into office, Trump's approval and disapproval rating was split 45 percent to 45 percent, respectively. On Feb. 21, about halfway through his first three months in office, 42 percent of Americans approved of Trump, while 52 percent disapproved, Gallup polls show.

Though Trump's approval rating reached a new low Monday, it has been among its highest levels since the beginning of March. On March 10, Trump's approval was at 45 percent, 1 point shy of his high of 46 percent immediately after his inauguration.

That number has since plummeted amid the fallout and subsequent investigation of comments he made accusing former President Barack Obama of tapping Trump's phones at Trump Tower.

Sunday
Mar192017

Vernal Equinox Ushers in Spring Monday

There's no "official" start of spring, but for most the vernal equinox, or spring equinox, marks the start of the season.

And it's starting soon. The vernal equinox will happen at 5:28 a.m. CDT on Monday, March 20, 2017.

That marks the time when the sun crosses over the equator and the length of days and nights will be almost equal.

Almost equal.

The day that comes the closest to having 12 hours of equal day and night was March 16.

For example, in Alabama on March 16 the day length is 12 hours and 6 seconds in Birmingham, 11:59:51 in Huntsville and 12:00:40 in Mobile.

Day length has been growing since the winter solstice last Dec. 21. It will continue to increase until the summer solstice.

The equinoxes also mark the two times each year when the Earth is not tilted either forward or away from the sun, according to EarthSky.org.

Our planet is tilted on its axis at about 23.4 degrees, and as it makes its yearly trip around the sun one hemisphere faces the sun more than the other, hence we have the seasons.

So while the vernal equinox marks the start of astronomical spring in the northern Hemisphere, it is also the onset of fall in the southern Hemisphere.

The summer solstice will be June 20, 2017, at 11:24 p.m.

Sunday
Mar192017

GOP, Democratics Agree: No Evidence of Trump Wiretapping Charge

The Republican chairman and ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee said Sunday that there was no proof in new documents provided to Congress by the Justice Department on Friday to support President Trump’s claim that his predecessor had ordered wiretaps of Trump Tower.

“Was there a physical wiretap of Trump Tower? No, but there never was, and the information we got on Friday continues to lead us in that direction,” Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), the chairman, said on “Fox News Sunday.”

He added, “There was no FISA warrant that I’m aware of to tap Trump Tower” — a reference to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, a federal law that governs the issuance of search warrants in U.S. intelligence gathering.

Rep. Adam Schiff (Calif.), the panel’s top Democrat, said, “We are at the bottom of this: There is nothing at the bottom.”

The Republican leader of the House Intelligence Committee said Sunday he's seen no evidence that the Obama administration wiretapped Trump Tower, as President Trump has claimed, having reviewed information from the Department of Justice.

"Was there a physical wiretap of Trump Tower? No, there never was," Devin Nunes, of Cal., said in an interview on Fox News Sunday.

On Friday, the Department of Justice said it turned over information sought by congressional committees, which requested documents for any potential court orders or warrants related to Trump, his campaign surrogates, family or friends.

Nunes said he has seen no information of a foreign intelligence surveillance warrant to monitor Trump. He added that "if you take the president literally, it didn't happen."

He said there are possible "other surveillance activities," referring to the communications related to former national security adviser Michael Flynn that were leaked.

Asked whether the committee has seen evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, he said: "I'll give you a very simple answer: No."

On March 4, Trump made the wiretapping allegations in a series of Twitter posts. The White House has defended Trump's accusations, but broadened "wiretapping" to "broad surveillance."

Rep. Adam Schiff, of Cal., the Democrat's ranking member on the committee, said he expects FBI Director James Comey to deny Trump's claim at a hearing Monday.

"I expect that he will," Schiff said on Meet the Press on NBC. "And I hope that we can put at end to this wild goose chase because what the president said was just patently false. And the wrecking ball it created has banged into our British allies, our German allies."

Sunday
Mar192017

Pulitzer Prize Winning Journalist Jimmy Breslin Dies at 88

Jimmy Breslin, the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and best-selling author, died Sunday at his home in Manhattan, N.Y. He was 88.

Breslin had been ill with pneumonia; his second wife since 1982, Ronnie Eldridge, confirmed his death to The New York Times.

"The sidewalks of NY have lost a great one, Jimmy Breslin. Long before 9/11, Jimmy was showing how great average New Yorkers are," Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., posted on Twitter.

His writing career spanned more than half a century, including time as a columnist at the New York Daily News.

"Jimmy Breslin was a furious, funny, outrageous and caring voice of the people who made newspaper writing into literature," Daily News Editor-in-Chief Arthur Browne said in an obituary posted by the newspaper.

In 1969, he resigned from The New York Post after writing The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight, a humorous account of a Brooklyn mob that was later made into a movie. He also wrote Damon Runyon: A Life, a profile of a columnist who preceded him. His own memoir was I Want to Thank My Brain for Remembering Me.

He returned to news business, writing for The Daily News, where he won the Pulitzer in 1986. He left the daily to work for New York Newsday, then Newsday and located on Long Island, before returning to The Daily News.

"Once you get back in the newspapers, it's like heroin," Mr. Breslin told The New York Times. "You're there. That's all."

But he was often critical of newspapers.

He said: "Media -- the plural of mediocrity." And also: "Newspapers are so boring. How can you read a newspaper that starts with a 51-word lead sentence?"

The final Breslin work published was an excerpt of an autobiographical novel in progress that appeared last year on the Daily Beast. Breslin made his niece promise to finish it, according to stepdaughter Emily Eldridge.

His columns were often written from the perspective of the common man. He was among the writers credited with inventing "New Journalism," the use of novelistic techniques in columns.

In one of his columns that won the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, he focused on a single man, David Camacho, to humanize the AIDS epidemic, which was little covered at the time.

Breslin wrote: "He had two good weeks in July and then the fever returned and he was back in the hospital for half of last August. He got out again and returned to Eighth Street. The date this time doesn't count. By now, he measured nothing around him. Week, month, day, night, summer heat, fall chill, the color of the sky, the sound of the street, clothes, music, lights, wealth dwindled in meaning."

The Pulitzer committee wrote: "As a columnist, he found human angles that went straight to the heart of the story."

After John F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1963 he interviewed the doctor who tried to save him at Parkland Hospital in Dallas. Then, he wrote about the man who dug the president's grave at Arlington.

In 1977, Breslin received a letter from the serial killer known as Son of Sam, who had killed five young people in New York and wounded several others with a .44-caliber revolver. "P.S.: JB, Please inform all the detectives working the case that I wish them the best of luck," the killer wrote.

In an appeal for him to surrender, Breslin published the note at the suggestion of detectives but David Berkowitz killed twice more before being captured.

Sunday
Mar192017

Pulitzer Prize Winning Journalist Jimmy Breslin Dies at 88

Jimmy Breslin, the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and best-selling author, died Sunday at his home in Manhattan, N.Y. He was 88.

Breslin had been ill with pneumonia; his second wife since 1982, Ronnie Eldridge, confirmed his death to The New York Times.

"The sidewalks of NY have lost a great one, Jimmy Breslin. Long before 9/11, Jimmy was showing how great average New Yorkers are," Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., posted on Twitter.

His writing career spanned more than half a century, including time as a columnist at the New York Daily News.

"Jimmy Breslin was a furious, funny, outrageous and caring voice of the people who made newspaper writing into literature," Daily News Editor-in-Chief Arthur Browne said in an obituary posted by the newspaper.

In 1969, he resigned from The New York Post after writing The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight, a humorous account of a Brooklyn mob that was later made into a movie. He also wrote Damon Runyon: A Life, a profile of a columnist who preceded him. His own memoir was I Want to Thank My Brain for Remembering Me.

He returned to news business, writing for The Daily News, where he won the Pulitzer in 1986. He left the daily to work for New York Newsday, then Newsday and located on Long Island, before returning to The Daily News.

"Once you get back in the newspapers, it's like heroin," Mr. Breslin told The New York Times. "You're there. That's all."

But he was often critical of newspapers.

He said: "Media -- the plural of mediocrity." And also: "Newspapers are so boring. How can you read a newspaper that starts with a 51-word lead sentence?"

The final Breslin work published was an excerpt of an autobiographical novel in progress that appeared last year on the Daily Beast. Breslin made his niece promise to finish it, according to stepdaughter Emily Eldridge.

His columns were often written from the perspective of the common man. He was among the writers credited with inventing "New Journalism," the use of novelistic techniques in columns.

In one of his columns that won the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, he focused on a single man, David Camacho, to humanize the AIDS epidemic, which was little covered at the time.

Breslin wrote: "He had two good weeks in July and then the fever returned and he was back in the hospital for half of last August. He got out again and returned to Eighth Street. The date this time doesn't count. By now, he measured nothing around him. Week, month, day, night, summer heat, fall chill, the color of the sky, the sound of the street, clothes, music, lights, wealth dwindled in meaning."

The Pulitzer committee wrote: "As a columnist, he found human angles that went straight to the heart of the story."

After John F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1963 he interviewed the doctor who tried to save him at Parkland Hospital in Dallas. Then, he wrote about the man who dug the president's grave at Arlington.

In 1977, Breslin received a letter from the serial killer known as Son of Sam, who had killed five young people in New York and wounded several others with a .44-caliber revolver. "P.S.: JB, Please inform all the detectives working the case that I wish them the best of luck," the killer wrote.

In an appeal for him to surrender, Breslin published the note at the suggestion of detectives but David Berkowitz killed twice more before being captured.

Saturday
Mar182017

Rock and Roll Pioneer Chuck Berry Dies at 90

The legendary guitarist Chuck Berry, who merged blues and swing into the phenomenon of early rock’n’roll, died on Saturday aged 90, according to Missouri police.

“Inside the home, first responders observed an unresponsive man and immediately administered lifesaving techniques,” the police department said. “Unfortunately, the 90-year-old man could not be revived and was pronounced deceased at 1.26pm.”

Officer Nate Bolin confirmed to the Guardian that Berry, whose full name was Charles Edward Anderson Berry Sr, had died.

The department said Berry’s family has requested privacy “during this time of bereavement”.

Tributes came from across the popular music landscape.

The multi-instrumentalist and producer Questlove wrote: “Thou Shall Have No Other Rock Gods Before Him #ChuckBerry rip.” Singer Alyssa Milano said: “Rest In Peace, Chuck Berry. You changed music. You changed everyone that listened to your music. Thank you.”

 Chuck Berry seen circa 1958. Photograph: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Berry was born in a middle-class neighborhood of St Louis in 1926 and picked up the guitar in high school. As a teenager he was arrested for attempted robbery and served three years in form school, after which he worked in an assembly line at a General Motors factory.

He turned to music full-time in the 1950s, when he formed a trio with a dummer, Ebby Harding, and a keyboardist, Johnnie Johnson, with whom he rose through St Louis clubs while working on the side as a hairdresser.

His break came in 1955 when he met blues musician Muddy Waters and producer Leonard Chess in Chicago, and for the rest of the decade Berry blended the country and blues songs of the south with pop sensibilities starting to echo on the radio.

He recorded some of his most famous hits in the 1950s, including Rock & Roll Music, Roll Over Beethoven, Johnny B Good, Maybellene and School Day.

Berry’s music was hugely influential around the world. John Lennon famously said: “If you had to give rock’n’roll another name, you might call it Chuck Berry.”

In 1959, Berry was arrested in St Louis on charges relating to a 14-year-old girl, whom authorities said he had transported across state lines for the purposes of prostitution.

He was convicted two years later, after an initial conviction was dismissed because of a judge’s repeated racial slurs, and spent 20 months in prison, an experience which his friends said changed the musician’s demeanor.

Remembering a 1964 tour with Berry, the guitarist Carl Perkins told a journalisthe “never saw a man so changed”.

“He had been an easygoing guy before, the kinda guy who’d jam in dressing rooms, sit and swap licks and jokes,” Perkins said. “In England he was cold, real distant and bitter.

“It wasn’t just jail. It was those years of one-nighters: grinding it out like that can kill a man. But I figure it was mostly jail.”

Friday
Mar172017

Podcast: S.C. Senate Dist. 3 Candidates Launch Campaigns

Podcast Features Complete Audio of Event.

Friday
Mar172017

Can You Help Find the Girl Scout Cookie Robbers?

On March 12, 2017, Anderson County deputies responded to a robbery call at the Walmart on Hwy 153 in Powdersville. While a mother and daughter were selling Girl Scout Cookies at a table in front of the store, an unknown black female grabbed the money box from the seller’s table and attempted to flee.

In an attempt to retrieve her money box, the seller was punched and kicked to the ground receiving minor injuries.  The female subject did get into a black Jeep Grand Cherokee driven by another female subject and left the parking lot turning right headed towards Greenville.  The subject is described as wearing a black sweatshirt and dark jeans with black spikey Mohawk style blue tipped hair.

The photos are not sharp, but here they are. Anyone with information regarding this incident or the identification of this individual are asked to contact the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office at 864-260-4400.

Friday
Mar172017

Bradford Pears: the Good, Bad and Ugly

By Bob Polomski, Ph.D./Clemson University

Once upon a time the Bradford pear (Pyrus calleryana ‘Bradford’) was the darling of the nursery industry. Since its debut on the cover of American Nurseryman magazine on April 15, 1963, Bradford pear’s popularity soared as a street-tough tree that offered beauty and durability.

In early spring Bradford pear trees erupted into bloom, these giant ovate snowballs of bright white flowers that were best admired from a distance because of their rotting fish aroma. The flowers, favored by honeybees, bumblebees and other pollinators oblivious to the stench, gave rise to leathery, dark glossy green leaves that “present[ed] a pleasing picture, particularly as they stir in the breeze and their wavy edges catch and reflect the sun’s rays,”  according to the authors of the 1963 American Nurseryman article “Bradford ornamental pear—a promising shade tree.” In the fall the longlasting leaves exploded into shades of orange, red, and purple. The beauty of Bradford pear was matched by its unparalleled toughness: tolerance to drought, pollution, and pests, notably to fire blight, a devastating bacterial disease that injures and kills edible pears.

Bradford pear appeared to be the perfect ornamental street tree, but like kryptonite and Superman, Bradford pear’s Achille’s heel was its production of closely spaced upright branches. As these poorly attached branches grew and expanded in girth, the crown to split apart, often during snow-, ice-, and windstorms. It often happened to unpruned or poorly pruned trees when they reached 15 to 20 years of age.

In the past I counseled anyone who purchased a Bradford pear to buy a pruning saw as well. As described in the 1963 American Nurseryman article, the limbs of young trees must be selectively removed to produce branches with wider angles and stronger unions to develop a strong canopy.

To overcome this structural flaw, cultivars were developed that offered improved branching habits, such as ‘Aristocrat’ and ‘Chanticleer’, a 2005 Urban Tree of the Year by the Society of Municipal Arborists. Other cultivars were developed with narrower forms, such as 'Capital', a U. S. National Arboretum release, that embodied the aesthetic and urban-tolerant traits of Bradford but offered applications in tight, confined locations.

This profusion of callery pear cultivars eventually led to another problem that had ecological consequences. In the past, Bradford pear rarely produced viable fruit because it’s self-infertile and cannot pollinate itself.  With the widespread planting of cultivars that were differed slightly genetically, the barrier to fertility and subequent fruit production was overcome. In some cases the callery pear understock of a Bradford pear would sprout, flower, and provide pollen. The fruits were consumed and dispersed by starlings, robins, and other animals to open, disturbed habitats where the progeny formed dense thickets.

Callery pears mature early—flowering at 3 years of age--and is one of the first trees to bloom in early spring. It’s also one of the last trees to lose its leaves. Callery pears are resistant to insects and diseases and their thorny stems and branches discourage deer-browsing. Interestingly, the "Survivor Tree” at the 9/11 Memorial is a callery pear that survived the September 11, 2001 terror attacks at the World Trade Center. In the context of the Memorial, it serves as a symbol of survival, recovery, and resilience.

Some states in the mid-Atlantic, southeast and midwest regions have declared callery pear an invasive, self-sustaining species that dominates and disrupts native flora. In South Carolina callery pear is on the “watch list.”

In the past I encouraged Bradford pear owners in our state to selectively prune the branches. Now that I witnessed large tracts of land throughout our state covered like a white fog in early spring, I encourage them to prune their trees at soil level.

The glorification and eventual demonization of  Bradford pear is the result of our unwillingness to foster biodiversity in our urban environments. While we make our communities more livable for people, we don’t do the same for trees. We disregard decades of arboricultural research and practices and continue to shoe-horn trees into unsustainable 4 square ft. tree pits that are better suited for traffic lights, signs, and streetlights than trees. It’s the survival of the fittest, and only a handful of tree species can exist in these inhospitable conditions. Bradford pear is one of them.

This monocultural approach that relies on a single or limited number of species or cultivars had already led to catastrophic losses in our urban forests as witnessed by the demise of American elms to Dutch elm disease and ashes to emerald ash borer. However, we continue to rely on a handful of nearly indestructible species and cultivars that thrive in wretched conditions. Crapemyrtle, Chinese elm, sawtooth oak, and Chinese pistache have supplanted Bradford pear as street-smart urban warriors.

Because cities are responsible for 70% of the world’s greenhouse-gas emissions but comprise only 2% of the world’s land mass (Time; Dec. 26, 2016/Jan. 2, 2017), we rely on trees to assume a greater role as ecological engineers in our urban communities. It’s important that communities create growing conditions that support a diverse population of native and noninvasive adapted tree species that provide environmental services and not ecological messes.

Bob Polomski, Ph.D. is a Clemson Extension Specialist--Horticulture/Adjunct Asst. Prof. • Dept. of Plant & Environmental Sciences

Friday
Mar172017

JCPenny to Close Easley Store as Part of Nationwide Cuts

JCPenney has released the list of 138 stores it plans to close in an effort to cut costs and grow sales at its strongest locations, and the Easley store is on the list. The Charleston store in Citadel Mall is the only other South Carolina store closing on the list.

The release comes a few weeks after Penney's said it would close up to 140 stores this year, following similar decisions from Macy's and Sears. Between the companies' four biggest chains, which include Sears' Kmart brand, more than 300 big-box stores will go dark this year alone.

The closures highlight the pressures on traditional department stores, which are losing market share to off-price competitors and Amazon. They also underscore the deteriorating economics at lower-quality shopping centers, whose risk of failure rises when an anchor tenant exits.

"We believe closing stores will allow us to adjust our business to effectively compete against the growing threat of online retailers," J.C. Penney CEO Marvin Ellison said in a statement back in February.

The company said at that time that most of its closures would occur in the second quarter. Liquidations will start April 17, it said Friday.

Penney's expects to save roughly $200 million a year by exiting these locations, which contributed less than 5 percent of its annual sales. It plans to invest in its best stores and digital operations while whittling down $4.3 billion in long-term debt.

Roughly 5,000 jobs will be affected by the closures, Penney's said Friday. At the time of its initial announcement, the company said it would provide some 6,000 employees with a "voluntary early retirement program," depending on their age and tenure. Eligible employees have until March 31 to decide whether they will accept the package, a spokeswoman said.

In addition to that offer, Penney's said Friday that it is trying to relocate certain leaders and will provide outplacement support services for eligible workers.

The moves will result in a pretax charge of roughly $225 million in the first half of fiscal 2017.

In addition to its store closures, Penney's is shutting down one supply chain facility in Lakeland, Fla., and relocating another in Buena Park, Calif.

Wall Street is already speculating that more closures could be ahead. At a recent meeting with analysts in New York City, Penney's said it is testing the rollout of Sephora beauty shops and home appliances in its smaller stores. Those categories have been fueling sales growth at the company's bigger locations.

Cowen and Co. analyst Oliver Chen warned if the tests are not successful, Penney's may need to close additional stores in the future.

More closures are already expected at Macy's. The chain has so far announced just 68 of the 100 locations it plans to exit, and said last month that the remainder of those stores will go dark "over the next few years."

List of JC Penney upcoming store closures

Mall/Shopping Center 
City 
State 
Auburn Mall Auburn AL
Tannehill Promenade Bessemer AL
Gadsden Mall Gadsden AL
Jasper Mall Jasper AL
Military Plaza Benton AR
Chickasaw Plaza Blytheville AR
Riverview Mall Bullhead City AZ
Downtown Bishop Bishop CA
Sunwest Plaza Lodi CA
The Village at Orange Orange CA
Hilltop Mall Richmond CA
Fort Morgan Main St. Fort Morgan CO
Glenwood Springs Mall Glenwood Springs CO
St. Vrain Centre Longmont CO
Broadway Plaza Sterling CO
Connecticut Post Mall Milford CT
Jacksonville Regional Shopping Center Jacksonville FL
Palatka Mall Palatka FL
Dublin Mall Dublin GA
Macon Mall Macon GA
Milledgeville Mall Milledgeville GA
Gateway Plaza Thomasville GA
Tifton Mall Tifton GA
Downtown Decorah Decorah IA
Crossroads Mall Fort Dodge IA
Penn Central Mall Oskaloosa IA
Quincy Place Ottumwa IA
Snake River Plaza Burley ID
Eastland Mall Bloomington IL
Fulton Square Canton IL
Village Square Mall Effingham IL
Freestanding Macomb IL
Peru Mall Peru IL
Northland Mall Sterling IL
Centerpointe of Woodridge Woodridge IL
FairOaks Mall Columbus IN
Connersville Plaza Connersville IN
Huntington Plaza Huntington IN
Jasper Manor Center Jasper IN
Logansport Mall Logansport IN
Chanute Square Chanute KS
Downtown Great Bend Great Bend KS
Hutchinson Mall Hutchinson KS
Freestanding Lawrence KS
Winfield Plaza Winfield KS
Cortana Mall Baton Rouge LA
Park Terrace DeRidder LA
North Shore Square Slidell LA
Berkshire Mall Lanesborough MA
Easton Marketplace Easton MD
Rockland Plaza Rockland ME
Lakeview Square Mall Battle Creek MI
Delta Plaza Escanaba MI
Westshore Mall Holland MI
Copper Country Mall Houghton MI
Birchwood Mall Kingsford MI
Midland Mall Midland MI
Cascade Crossings Sault Ste. Marie MI
Central Lakes Crossing Baxter MN
Five Lakes Centre Fairmont MN
Faribo West Mall Faribault MN
Irongate Plaza Hibbing MN
Hutchinson Mall Hutchinson MN
Red Wing Mall Red Wing MN
Downtown Thief River Falls Thief River Falls MN
Freestanding Winona MN
Maryville Center Maryville MO
Leigh Mall Columbus MS
Southgate Plaza Corinth MS
Greenville Mall Greenville MS
Bonita Lakes Mall Meridian MS
Oxford Mall Oxford MS
Capital Hill Mall Helena MT
Sidney Main Street Sidney MT
Albemarle Crossing Albemarle NC
Boone Mall Boone NC
Eastridge Mall Gastonia NC
Blue Ridge Mall Hendersonville NC
Monroe Crossing Monroe NC
Becker Village Mall Roanoke Rapids NC
Prairie Hills Mall Dickinson ND
Buffalo Mall Jamestown ND
Downtown Wahpeton Wahpeton ND
Fremont Mall Fremont NE
Downtown McCook McCook NE
Platte River Mall North Platte NE
Rio Grande Plaza Rio Grande NJ
The Boulevard Las Vegas NV
Dunkirk-Fredonia Plaza Dunkirk NY
Westfield Sunrise Massapequa NY
Palisades Center West Nyack NY
Findlay Village Mall Findlay OH
New Towne Mall New Philadelphia OH
Richmond Town Square Richmond Heights OH
St. Mary's Square St. Marys OH
Altus Plaza Altus OK
Ne-Mar Shopping Center Claremore OK
Ponca Plaza Ponca City OK
Pioneer Square Shopping Center Stillwater OK
Astoria Downtown Astoria OR
Grants Pass Shopping Center Grants Pass OR
La Grande Downtown La Grande OR
Downtown Pendleton Pendleton OR
The Dalles Main Street The Dalles OR
Columbia Mall Bloomsburg PA
Clearfield Mall Clearfield PA
King of Prussia Mall King of Prussia PA
Philadelphia Mills Philadelphia PA
Bradford Towne Centre Towanda PA
Lycoming Mall Pennsdale PA
Willow Grove Park Willow Grove PA
Citadel Mall Charleston SC
Town 'N Country Easley SC
Palace Mall Mitchell SD
Northridge Plaza Pierre SD
Watertown Mall Watertown SD
Yankton Mall Yankton SD
Greeneville Commons Greeneville TN
Knoxville Center Knoxville TN
County Market Place Union City TN
Athens Village Shopping Center Athens TX
Borger Shopping Plaza Borger TX
Heartland Mall Early TX
El Paso Downtown El Paso TX
Marshall Mall Marshall TX
McAllen Downtown McAllen TX
University Mall Nacogdoches TX
King Plaza Shopping Center Seguin TX
Bosque River Center Stephenville TX
New River Valley Mall Christiansburg VA
Tanglewood Mall Roanoke VA
Pilchuck Landing Snohomish WA
Pine Tree Mall Marinette WI
Marshfield Mall Marshfield WI
Richland Square Shopping Center Richland Center WI
Rapids Mall Wisconsin Rapids WI
Foxcroft Towne Center Martinsburg WV
Friday
Mar172017

Colbert New King of Late Night Televison

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert remained the highest-rated late-night show for a sixth week in a row, though The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon still had a slight edge in the 18-49 demo despite being in repeats. For the week of March 6th, The Late Show drew 3.23 million viewers, its largest weekly audience since Colbert’s first week as host in September 2015. According to the New York Post, that helped give CBS its longest winning streak in late-night since the 2009-2010 season during David Letterman’s tenure while Conan O’Brien was hosting The Tonight Show.

The CBS program was up from 3 million viewers for the previous week, though it remained flat in the demo with a 0.55 rating, slightly behind The Tonight Show’s 0.6, but above the 0.49 rating for Jimmy Kimmel Live, which also took third place in total viewership with 2.28 million viewers in the time slot compared to the 2.47 million weekly average for The Tonight Show encores.

Colbert’s ratings bump is even helping The Late Late Show with James Corden, which had the biggest increase of the week from a 0.30 to a 0.35 demo rating, along with 1.44 million viewers, giving it a rare win over Late Night with Seth Meyers in both measures, though the NBC show was also in reruns.

Elsewhere, The Daily Show with Trevor Noah dipped from a solid 0.35 rating to a 0.32 on Comedy Central, averaging just under 1 million viewers, while Conan increased from a 0.23 to a 0.27 in the 18-49 demo.

Colbert has undoubtedly benefited from a Donald Trump presidency, along with other liberal-leaning shows like Full Frontal with Samantha BeeReal Time with Bill Maher and The Rachel Maddow Show, which was the highest-rated cable news program last week. The MSNBC show likely got a big bump this week (Nielsen ratings have been delayed due to a power outage) thanks to a much-hyped episode where she unveiled one year of Trump’s tax returns (Update: The show had its highest-rated episode ever with 4.1 million viewers and a 1.0 demo rating per Vulture). But her long drawn out announcement has received plenty of backlash, and was even parodied by Colbert in Wednesday’s Late Show cold open.

The ratings for The Late Show are a huge turnaround from last fall when the series hit an all-time low since Colbert succeeded Letterman, falling to a 0.36 rating and just 1.98 million viewers in September of last year. But things have been on the upswing since the beginning of 2017, especially since Trump’s inauguration, as viewers starting tuning in in droves to watch Colbert mercilessly mock the president’s every move.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, Fallon has seen a precipitous drop in the ratings since last season, fueling speculation that liberals abandoned his show after his chummy interview with then-candidate Trump, prompting reports that NBC is urging the comedian to get more political in his sketches and opening monologue as a way to keep up with Colbert.

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert airs weeknights at 11:35 p.m. on CBS. However, the late-night series is off the next two nights thanks to March Madness.

Thursday
Mar162017

FOX21: Citizens Worried About Speeders on Gentry Road

People who live on Gentry Road in Anderson County have complained speeders are putting them in a danger zone. Located right off of Highway 81 in Starr, the rural road has no posted speed limit, according to resident Angela Rietzel. 

"Somebody's gonna get killed," she said. "It's gotten really serious. What I am worried about is every morning when I get my daughter onto the bus - who is going to smack into the back of the bus?" 

"My daughter's school bus almost got hit three times last year," said Rietzel. 

Signs warning drivers of school bus traffic dot the road, but Rietzel showed FOX Carolina cell phone video of one of the signs after it had been run over by a car. Rietzel and her neighbor Darren Mitchell said simply posting speed limit signs is not enough. 

County officials, however, said installing speed bumps on rural roads isn't an option without a formal speed study. 

State law requires speed bumps to be installed in only urban - not rural - areas, according to Anderson County Public Works Administrator Holt Hopkins. "Urban," he said, means homes are within 100 feet of each other. He said that is not the case on Gentry Road, adding the speed limit would not be allowed to be under 35 mph because it is a rural road. 

He also told us each speed bump, if installed, would cost $1,200 - and half of each one would have to be paid by residents. 

"County Council would pay the other half, but that is what our ordinance currently says," said Hopkins. 

Hopkins said Council might consider additional signage for the road. 

Rietzel said residents have signed a petition for speed bumps and asked for more patrol officers from the county. 

"Somebody is going to die out here, it's not a joke. It's serious," she said.

Thursday
Mar162017

Shiloh Church Road Bridge Replacement to Close Road April 4

The Anderson County Roads and Bridges Department will close a portion of Shiloh Church Road near Highway 17 in the Wren community on April 4  to replace the west bridge near Shiloh Creek Subdivision. The roadway will be closed between Highway 17 and Cane Hill Drive, C-01-0307, for approximately one year. The new bridge is scheduled to be open to traffic by April 4, 2018.

Until then, the posted detour will follow Highway 17 north to Hurricane Creek Road. 

The existing road and bridge near Highway 17 is too narrow for the volume of trucks using the road.  The new bridge will be a 30-feet-long precast concrete hallow-cored slab, 33-feet wide with concrete parapets on each side. Approximately 1,000 feet of roadway near intersection of Highway 17 will be reconstructed. Estimated construction cost of $240,000 funded through the county’s general fund with Roads and Bridges providing labor and equipment.

The posted detour will follow Highway 17 north to Hurricane Creek Road.